Logie Fythenach.

 

Associated Chapels: Bridge of Ess, Tullidivie.

OS Ref: NJ 019465   RCAHMS No: NJ04NW 19

In the earliest of times this parish was known as Logie Fythenach but is today named Edinkillie. The present parish church, which has great character, dates from 1741 and its situation just above a crossing point of the River Divie is spectacular.

However, this was not the original seat of the parish church. It is known that a 'chapel' existed at Logie (Logie Tytherach {Fasti Eccles. Scot., H. Scott et al ed. 1926}) and it is said that its remains could still be identified as late as 1924, although no trace is to be found today. The house and estate is still known as Logie. It the early records of the diocese the parish was known as Logie Fythenach and its tithes formed part of the prebend of the Archdeacon of the Diocese of Moray, the church being then served by a vicar. It  is probable that this was the original parish church, being moved at the later date to its present site, known also as Glenernie. Much of the land in these parts was the property of the Bishop - he held the baronies of Rafford and Ardclach - and, of course, nearby is the famous Darnaway Estate of the Earls of Moray.

The dedication of the church is not known but, in the Exchequer Rolls, Vol xxi, p.597, there is reference to the "chaplainry of St John Baptist at Logie in dioc. M" and this may give us an indication. McKenzie speaks of a Templar connection with this church at Logie.

 

The present parish church of Edinkillie.

 

The churchyard with its watch-house.

The graveyard is well kept by Moray District Council and is well worth a visit to appreciate its setting.

For many years the patronage of the church has been associated with the family of the Earls of Moray.

 

There is a suggestion of a chapel at Tullidivie in the vicinity of Relugas but nothing more is known of it.

There is also a tradition of a chapel at the Bridge of Ess (NJ 008460) of which little or no trace can now be found. It is supposed to have been one of the first Christian foundations in the area. It is not improbable that there was, at least, a chapel here at the crossing point of the Dorback Burn.

 

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